Living with epilepsy

Having seizures, or being told “you have epilepsy”, can affect people in different ways. This includes driving, sleep, work and travel.

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Living with epilepsy

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Sometimes epilepsy can be hard to come to terms with.

Some people feel relieved to be given a name and treatment for their condition. Sometimes epilepsy can be hard to come to terms with. Talking about any worries, asking questions and sharing information about epilepsy may help you, or your family and friends, to make sense of what is happening.

Driving

If you drive, one immediate effect of having a seizure is that you have to stop driving. This is true for all types of seizures, and whether you have a diagnosis of epilepsy or not. For many people, this can have a big impact on their life and it may be very difficult or upsetting.

Work and employment

Having epilepsy does not necessarily stop someone from doing the job they want, but there are some issues which can affect them at work. Whether someone’s epilepsy affects their work depends on whether they have seizures, what their seizures are like and how often these happen.

Sport and leisure

To live full and active lives, and look after our physical and emotional wellbeing, we all need time to rest, relax and exercise. How we spend our leisure time is important and individual to us all, whether or not we have epilepsy.

Women and epilepsy

Some issues around epilepsy and its treatment are specific to women and do not apply in the same way to men. These include links between epilepsy and hormones, puberty, contraception, pregnancy and the menopause.

Students with their mortar boards

University and epilepsy

If you're considering going to university or if you’ve definitely decided that’s what you want to do, you’ll need to think about what this will mean for you in practical terms and about what support you might need, including financial support. Being well prepared will help you to make the most of your time at university. 

Travel

Travel and holidays

Having epilepsy does not usually prevent people from being able to travel by air. However, some people’s seizures are triggered by being very tired (which could happen because of long journeys or ‘jet lag’).