World leading research

"It's very important that the clinical knowledge and the understanding of people with epilepsy drives research as this allows us always to have the person at the centre."

Ley Sander is Professor of Neurology, Head of the Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy at UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, Consultant Neurologist at UCLH National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Medical Director at Epilepsy Society.

Our research philosophy

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Research aims

The ultimate goals of our current research are to spearhead personalised treatment and to incorporate genomic diagnosis into the NHS for people with epilepsy.

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Cutting edge research

Epilepsy Society's Chalfont Centre is unique in bringing together intellectual capital to form a powerhouse multidisciplinary team who contribute to a wide ranging spectrum of research.

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Research areas

Epilepsy Society funded research falls under four integrated areas: genomics, neuroimaging, neuropsychology and neuropathology.

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Genomic research

Genomic medicine has the potential to transform the way we care for people with epilepsy, and we believe that whole genome sequencing will help us to unravel the genetic architecture underlying the different types of epilepsy.

Our research explained

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(TMS)

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) can establish a link between brain activity and different types of sensory, motor and cognitive functions. We can then establish whether a specific genetic change is impacting on the function of the brain.

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    Optical Coherence Tomography

    Optical Coherence Tomography is one of the most advanced scanning tools used to measure the thickness of the retinal fibres at the back of the eye.

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    3D Facial Imaging

    Using 3D facial imaging, we can establish whether there is a link between face shape and genetic variations which can lead to epilepsy.

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    Genetic Architecture of the Epilepsies and Heart Disorders

    Understanding the genetic architecture of the epilepsies and heart disorders is helping us to recognise the links between SUDEP and cardiorespiratory dysfunction.

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  5. Whole Genome Sequencing

    Whole genome sequencing will help us to unravel the genetic architecture underlying the epilepsy of more people.

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    The Epilepsy Society Brain and Tissue Bank

    The Epilepsy Society Brain and Tissue Bank is dedicated to the study of epilepsy, by providing brain and other tissue for a wide range of epilepsy research projects.

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  7. brain icon

    Epilepsy Navigator

    The Epilepsy Navigator software enables more sophisticated and accurate brain surgery for epilepsy, which will increase numbers of people who can become seizure free.

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Our research areas

Epilepsy Society funded research falls under four integrated areas: genomics, neuroimaging, neuropsychology and neuropathology (Epilepsy Society's Brain and Tissue Bank).  We also carry out research in other psychological and health service areas and epidemiology (global health and outcomes).

We are part of a unique arrangement with UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology and the UCLH National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. This ensures academic and clinical excellence, patient input and relevance of our medical research. 

A person being scanned by our Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) scanner (pictured right).

Genomics

Read how we are working to understand the genetic architecture of each individual person's epilepsy through our world leading genomics research programme.

Life changing research

At age 30, Aidan was no longer responding to emergency medication.  Four times he had to be put into an induced coma to stop his seizures. Then genetic tests revealed he had a mutation in the SCN1A gene which was causing Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy. By prescribing him different medication, we were able to help bring his seizures under control.

We do not conduct research using animal testing.

Epilepsy Society does not conduct research using animals. Read our policy statement.

At the moment we can only recruit people for our research who are under the care of UCLH.
Find out how to be considered for future research projects.

 

Someone using our DNA analyser in our wet lab

Epilepsy research papers

We've compiled a summary of our latest research papers for you to read, written by our powerhouse multidisciplinary team who contribute to a wide ranging spectrum of epilepsy research. 

These papers give you a snapshot of our teams clinical and research knowledge, which is helping us to further our understanding of people with epilepsy.

Our research

Our researchers

subtitle: Meet the team

Meet the team at Epilepsy Society leading the way in global research. Our team are passionate about translating research findings to improve the lives of people with epilepsy.

Walk around our laboratory

subtitle: 360-degree experience

Take part in our immersive 360-degree experience which takes you on the journey of a genome through our wet laboratory. Our research team will explain what happens to a patient's genome at every stage through video and interactive elements.

Join our team

subtitle: Join us

Epilepsy Society’s Chalfont Centre is unique in bringing together intellectual capital to form a powerhouse multidisciplinary team who contribute to a wide ranging spectrum of research. It is only by working together that we will be able to translate the findings of our research into clinical medicine.

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